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Framing the dialogues : how to read openings and closures in Plato / edited by Eleni Kaklamanou, Maria Pavlou, Antonis Tsakmakis.

Contributor(s): Kaklamanou, Eleni [editor.] | Pavlou, Maria [editor.] | Tsakmakis, Antonis [editor.] | Framing the Dialogues: How to Read Openings and Closures in Plato (Conference) (2015 : University of Cyprus)Material type: TextTextSeries: Brill's Plato studies series ; volume 6Publisher: Leiden ; Boston : Brill, [2021]Description: xi, 318 pages ; 25 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9789004443983Subject(s): Plato -- Technique -- Congresses | Plato -- Criticism and interpretation -- CongressesDDC classification: N58 LOC classification: PA4326 | .F73 2021Summary: "It is well known that scrutiny of Plato's first words begins with Proclus' commentary on the Parmenides. Proclus asks how we, the readers of a Platonic dialogue, could or should treat the prooimia of the dialogues. Proclus supports the view that a reader should first understand the dialogue and then revisit the opening scene, aiming to understand how the philosophical content developed in the main part of the dialogue sheds light on the prelude. It is thanks to Myles Burnyeat that Proclus' approach to the Platonic prooimia became part of the contemporary discussion regarding the nature of Plato's first words"-- Provided by publisher.
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These chapters are based on papers presented at the conference 'Framing the Dialogues: How to Read Openings and Closures in Plato', held at the University of Cyprus in December 2015.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 281-304) and indexes.

"It is well known that scrutiny of Plato's first words begins with Proclus' commentary on the Parmenides. Proclus asks how we, the readers of a Platonic dialogue, could or should treat the prooimia of the dialogues. Proclus supports the view that a reader should first understand the dialogue and then revisit the opening scene, aiming to understand how the philosophical content developed in the main part of the dialogue sheds light on the prelude. It is thanks to Myles Burnyeat that Proclus' approach to the Platonic prooimia became part of the contemporary discussion regarding the nature of Plato's first words"-- Provided by publisher.

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